Asahi Aera: The gaikokujin left behind during natural disasters

From Aera, a magazine published by the Asahi Shimbun, on gaikokujin in Japan who feel most isolated when typhoons or earthquakes strike in Japan:

最大震度7の巨大地震に襲われた北海道では、外国人観光客や在留外国人も被災した。北海道庁は地震発生当日の6日、英中韓の3言語で相談を受け付ける臨時電話窓口を開設。避難所や給水所などの情報提供のほか、それぞれ個別の相談にも乗っている。気象庁は緊急地震速報や津波警報などで使用される単語を多言語に翻訳した辞書を作成したり、ホームページで台風や地震などの災害情報を英語で詳細に発信したりしている。日本政府観光局や各自治体、民間のNGOなどを含めると、外国人向けの情報発信はたくさんあるのだ。

Tourists from overseas and resident gaikokujin were also affected by the major earthquake, which had a maximum magnitude of 7.0, in Hokkaido. The day the earthquake struck, the Hokkaido prefectural government opened a temporary hotline that took calls in English, Chinese, and Korean. The hotline provided information on evacuation sites and water provision stations, as well as advice on individual matters. The Japanese Meteorological Agency made a multilingual dictionary of Japanese words used in emergency earthquake warnings and tsunami bulletins, and provided detailed information on typhoons and earthquakes in English on its website. If one includes the efforts by the national tourist bureau, local governments, and civil society NGOs, there was a lot of information provided for and broadcast to gaikokujin.

こうしたサービスが存在していることを知らない外国人が圧倒的に多い。外国人が日常生活で頼る日本人の友人らも存在を知らないため、発信した情報が、肝心の外国人まで届いていないのが現状だ。いかに外国人に直接情報を伝えるのかの試行錯誤が続いている。

The vast majority of gaikokujin do not know about these services. Neither do the Japanese people who gaikokujin rely on in their everyday lives. Therefore, the current situation is that the information broadcast is not reaching their intended audience: the gaikokujinThe trial and error of getting information directly to gaikokujin continues.